Resident Faculty

Rosie Bsheer

rosie.bsheer@yale.edu

Rosie Bsheer is an Assistant Professor of History, focusing on the modern Middle East. Her teaching and research interests center on Arab intellectual and social movements, petro-capitalism and state formation, and the production of historical knowledge and commemorative spaces. She is currently finishing up a book manuscript, provisionally entitled, Archive Wars: Spectacle, Speculation, and the Politics of History in Saudi Arabia (under contract with Stanford University Press). She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on oil and empire, social and intellectual movements, petro-modernity, historiography, and the making of the modern Middle East. She is Associate Producer of the 2007 Oscar-nominated film My Country, My Country and a co-editor of Jadaliyya E-zine.

Crystal Feimster

crystal.feimster@yale.edu

Crystal Feimster, (Ph.D., Princeton University, 2000), is Associate Professor of African American Studies, History and American Studies at Yale University. Feimster’s academic focus is racial and sexual violence; currently, she is completing a project on rape during the American Civil War. Her book, Southern Horrors: Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching, focuses on two women journalists, Ida B. Wells, who campaigned against lynching, and Rebecca Latimer Felton, who urged white men to prove their manhood by lynching black men accused of raping white women.

Jay Gitlin

jay.gitlin@yale.edu

Jay Gitlin received his BA and PhD at Yale. His work focuses on the history of the French in the Mississippi Valley and the Great Lakes. He is currently working on The Rise and Fall of Modern Shopping.  The Bourgeois Frontier: French Towns, French Traders & American Expansion was published in 2010 by Yale University Press and won the 2010 Alf Andrew Heggoy Prize for the best book in French colonial history from the French Colonial Historical Society.  He has published numerous articles and contributed chapters to the Oxford History of the American West (Oxford, 1994) and The Louisiana Purchase and the Emergence of the American Empire (Congressional Quarterly, 2003). He is also co-editor and co-author of Under an Open Sky: Rethinking America’s Western Past (W.W. Norton, 1992).

Paul Kennedy

paul.kennedy@yale.edu

Paul Kennedy, the J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History, Director of International Security Studies at Yale, and Distinguished Fellow of the Brady-Johnson Program in Grand Strategy, coordinates the ISS programs funded by the Smith Richardson Foundation. He is internationally known for his writings and commentaries on global political, economic, and strategic issues. Prof. Kennedy’s monthly column on current global issues is distributed worldwide by the Los Angeles Times Syndicate/Tribune Media Services. He is the author or editor of nineteen books, including The Rise of the Anglo-German Antagonism, The War Plans of the Great Powers, The Realities Behind Diplomacy, and Preparing for the Twenty-First Century. His best-known work is The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers, which provoked an intense debate on its publication in 1988 and has been translated into over twenty languages.

Michael Warner

michael.warner@yale.edu

My work ranges across a number of topics and styles, from scholarship in early American literature and print culture, to more theoretical writing about publics and social movements, to introductory editions and anthologies, to journalism and nonacademic political writing.  In connection with my work on print and the history of reading, I have been interested in several other disciplines, on topics such as new media, intellectual property.  One common thread across these fields is the way different social worlds are built up out of different circulating media and ways of reading or hearing.  At present I am working on a study of secularism.  It is partly a reflection on the dilemmas of secularism in the present; but that reflection is framed by a study of secular culture in America in the period before it was called secularism (roughly from the early eighteenth century to the Civil War).  This interest has led to two books: one, a collection of essays coedited with Craig Calhoun and Jonathan VanAntwerpen, published by Harvard University Press in 2010 under the title Varieties of Secularism in a Secular Age; it is a response to A Secular Age, by the philosopher Charles Taylor.  The other, to be published by the University of Pennsylvania Press, is based in the Rosenbach lectures I gave in the spring of 2009; it is to be titled The Evangelical Public Sphere in Eighteenth-Century America.