Resident Fellows

Saed Alizamir

saed.alizamir@yale.edu

Professor Alizamir’s research interests lie in the areas of social responsibility and sustainability as well as healthcare operations. His research is mainly focused on public policy-related problems in these settings that involve dynamic decision-making and learning. In studying private-public interactions, he incorporates operational elements into his analytical models and applies various tools from Operations Research and game theory. The goal of his research is to provide normative recommendations that can inform better policy decisions, especially in areas where not enough data exists to run full-fledged empirical studies. He has worked on government subsidy instruments in renewable energy industry and agriculture as well as optimal control of diagnostic systems such as nurse triage.

Farnaz Nojavan

fnojavan@gmail.com

 

Louisa Lombard

louisa.lombard@yale.edu

I am a cultural anthropologist who studies African borderland areas where the state is largely absent, and a range of actors govern. My research locales, primarily the remote and little-populated eastern reaches of the Central African Republic (C.A.R.), are further marked by violent histories that continue into the present. How, in such contexts, do people navigate fragile relationships of trust and claim access to resources and authority? My main fieldwork interlocutors are among the region’s men-in-arms, such as anti-poaching guards and rebels. In addition to introductory and theoretical approaches to socio-cultural anthropology, I teach classes on sub-Saharan Africa, and especially African politics; anthropology and law; war, violence, and insurgency; humanitarianism and development; and conservation and the management of frontiers.


Graeme Wood

gcawood@gmail.com

Graeme Wood is a correspondent for The Atlantic. He was the 2015-2016 Edward R. Murrow Press Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and is a lecturer in political science at Yale University. He was formerly a contributing editor to The New Republic and books editor of Pacific Standard.  Graeme was a reporter at The Cambodia Daily in Phnom Penh in 1999, then lived and wrote in the Middle East from 2002 to 2006.  He has received fellowships from the Social Sciences Research Council (2002-2003), the South Asian Journalists Association (2009), the East-West Center (2009-2010), and the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Center for the Prevention of Genocide (2013-2014).  He has appeared many times on television and radio (CNN, ABC, BBC, MSNBC, et al.), was the screenwriter of a Sundance Official Selection (2010, short film), and led a Nazi-hunting expedition to Paraguay for a History Channel special in 2009. Graeme attended Deep Springs College, Harvard, Indiana University, and the American University in Cairo.  Random House published his book, The Way of the Strangers: Encounters with the Islamic State, in 2016.